Arnie Risen

Induction Year : 2008

Sport: Basketball

There were no outbreaks of frenzied jubilation on High Street when the news unobtrusively leaked out that a tall l (6-9), rather skinny (210 lbs) basketball center nicknamed “Slats” had transferred to Ohio State from Eastern Kentucky State Teacher’s College. There should have been. In two seasons with the Buckeyes he would help lead them to two NCAA Final Four appearances, just the school’s second and third times ever in that elite company. He left as unobtrusively as he arrived the next season to sign a pro contract with the Indianapolis Kautskys of the National Basketball League which would launch a 12-year professional career that would eventually lead to his election to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of fame in 1998. After two seasons in the NBL he joined a group of stars including George Mikan, Jim Pollard and Red Holzman who jumped before the 1947-48 season to the rival Basketball Association of America which would morph to the NBA. Competing with the Rochester Royals from 1948 to 1955 and the Boston Celtics from 1955 to 1958 he would play on two NBA championship teams (Rochester in 1951 and on Boston’s first NBA title team in 1957) and was a four-time All-Star, scoring 7,633 points during his career. He has for many years made his home in Pepper Pike.

Tim McGee

Induction Year : 2008

Sport: Football

An Alumni Wall of Fame has been established within the halls of the beautifully renovated John Hay High School located at the edge of Cleveland’s University Circle. A check of the internet for a list of those honored reveals the surprising fact there is no one listed. Perhaps the Wall is just too new a feature. Or perhaps the keepers of the Wall do not recognize the alum who the school has listed in its records as Timothy Dwayne Hatchett when he was starring for the school’s football team in 1980 and 1981 before moving on to the University of Tennessee had blossomed into national stardom as Timothy Dwayne Hatchett McGee. That would be the Tim McGee who left Tennessee in 1985 as UT’s all-time leader in receptions, receiving yards and receiving touchdowns with a first team slot on the College Football All-American Team, the same Tim McGee who was selected in the first round of the 1986 NFL draft by the Cincinnati Bengals and became a major contributor there for eight seasons, leading the league in kickoff returns as a rookie, helping them to a Super Bowl championship in 1988 and enjoying his best personal season in 1989 with 65 receptions for 1,211 yards and eight touchdowns before joining the Washington Redskins for one season in 1993, then returning to Cincinnati for a final season before retiring. The strong candidate for the John Hay Alumni Wall of Fame now lives in the Cincinnati suburb of Mason and is the head basketball coach at Ursuline Academy.

Gary Trivosonno

Induction Year : 2008

Sport: Golf

One of the most dominant male golfers in Northeastern Ohio over the last three decades, he came out of St. Joseph High to earn a scholarship to the University of Alabama where would gain an eighth place finish in the 1978 College All-American Classic and All-SEC second team honors. By then he had already won the first two of his three Ohio Publinx championships and the 1977 Ohio Amateur championship. He added his third Ohio Publinx title in 1978 and was crowned the Ohio Open Champion in 1979. Honors kept piling up from there – seven Player of the Year citations on the NOPGA (Northern Ohio PGA) section, three NOPGA Match Play Championships, two NOPGA section championships, and most recently the 2008 Senior Open Championship. In 1996 he competed in the U.S. Open at Oakland Hills Country Club and in a signature moment found himself tied for fifth with a 69 after the first day. He has twice turned in scores of 61, but neither matched from a pride standpoint the 64 he fired at Aurora Country Club to tie the course record held jointly by Arnold Palmer, Bruce Devlin and Charles Coody. He was the head pro at Aurora from 1991 to 2005 and now manages and operates Strongsville Golf.

Dino Lucarelli

Induction Year : 2008

Sport: Football

It has been almost 50 years now since he began making friends and influencing people on behalf of Cleveland sports organizations. Ask anyone in position to know and they’ll tell you nobody’s done it better. The Garfield Heights High grad forsook promising careers as a bartender and with The Illuminating Company to take jobs as a publicist for the Cleveland Division of Recreation’s amateur sports programs and semi-pro Cleveland Bulldogs football team. He moved into the pro world in 1962 as the public relations and promotions director for the Cleveland Barons. He moved to the Indians in 1967, to the Stadium Corporation in 1975, and to the Browns in 1981 remaining with them until they moved to Baltimore in 1996. He elected to remain in Cleveland and went to work for the NFL and the Cleveland Browns Trust, where he became an integral cog in the efforts to bring a Browns team back to his beloved city. That done he rejoined the Browns and eventually settled into the role of Director of Alumni Relations, a job vital to reinforcing the bond between ex-players and the new regime. During much of his career he has been involved in an untold number of fund raising functions which have netted sums in seven-figure amounts for charities. His induction into the Greater Cleveland Sports Hall of Fame brings to four the Hall of Fame plaques on his wall, not to mention the Garfield Heights High School Distinguished Alumni Award. The Northern Ohio Football Foundation College Football Hall of Fame’s Humanitarian Award is named for him as is the Cleveland Chapter of the Professional Football Writers’ Association “Good Guy” Award and in 2002 the Dino Lucarelli Media Center was unveiled in the new Cleveland Browns Stadium.

Howie Glover

Induction Year : 2008

Sport: Hockey

Seven years his brother Fred’s junior, he already had a 10-year professional career etched on his record when he was traded by the Montreal Canadians to the Cleveland Barons joining his player-coach brother for the 1964-65 season. A fiery right winger, he had begun his pro career with Winnipeg of the Western League where he set a record for most rookie goals. Drafted by the NHL’s Chicago Blackhawks in 1958, he played briefly with Chicago then moved to Calgary. He played for the Buffalo Bisons of the AHL in 1958-60, carrying on a fierce rivalry with brother Fred, then played two years with the Detroit Red Wings in 1960-62, accumulating 21 goals and eight assists in his first season there and performing solidly as a checker when the Red Wings reached the Stanley Cup final. In his six seasons with the Barons he reached double digit totals in goals scored five times, highlighted by a career best 41-goal outburst in 1967-68 to earn the team’s MVP award. After retiring in 1969, he left his son Michael in Greater Cleveland where he remained deeply involved in coaching high school and minor league teams and frequently hosts his famous dad.
(Deceased)

The Glover Brothers

Fred and Howie Glover become only the fourth pair of siblings to be inducted into the Greater Cleveland Sports Hall of Fame when they are honored tonight and only the second to be inducted together, joining swimmers Gretchen and Christine Kluter who were honored in the first induction ceremonies in 1976. Paul Fina was inducted in 1978 for his feats in gymnastics and brother Louis followed in 1984. For sheer numbers, however, the Milkovich family still stands alone. Wrestlers Tom (1976) and Pat (1986) are enshrined with their father Mike, the legendary Maple Heights High coach who was honored for meritorious service in 1978.

Fred Glover

Induction Year : 2008

Sport: Hockey

One of the American Hockey League’s greatest stars he would become one of Cleveland’s most popular players after joining the Cleveland Barons in 1953. Prior to that he had played for the AHL’s Indianapolis Capitals in 1948-49, put in a pair of brief stints for the Detroit Red Wings in the NHL, returned to Indianapolis where he led the league in scoring with 48 goals in 1950-51 and was named to the league’s first all-star team. Called back to Detroit, he played 54 games for the Red Wings in 1951-52, helping them to the Stanley Cup. In the 15-year stint with the Barons which was to follow, the last five of which he also served as the team’s head coach, he would lead them to Calder Cup championships in 1954, 1957 and 1964, before retiring in 1968. At that time he was the league’s career leader in games played, goals (520) assists (814) and points scored (1,334). A six-time all-star, and two-time AHL scoring leader, his Number 9 was retired in 1969. He died at his home in Hayward, CA in August, 2001 at the age of 73.

The Glover Brothers

Fred and Howie Glover become only the fourth pair of siblings to be inducted into the Greater Cleveland Sports Hall of Fame when they are honored tonight and only the second to be inducted together, joining swimmers Gretchen and Christine Kluter who were honored in the first induction ceremonies in 1976. Paul Fina was inducted in 1978 for his feats in gymnastics and brother Louis followed in 1984. For sheer numbers, however, the Milkovich family still stands alone. Wrestlers Tom (1976) and Pat (1986) are enshrined with their father Mike, the legendary Maple Heights High coach who was honored for meritorious service in 1978.

Gary Jeter

Induction Year : 2008

Sport: Football

They didn’t come much better in Ohio’s high school football trenches in the Fall of 1972. In fact, no one in the state was better that season in the eyes of the Buckeye State’s sportswriters, who voted the Cleveland Cathedral Latin High prep star Ohio’s High School Lineman of the Year to go along with his national All-American honors. Those honors brought the nation’s premier college coaches scurrying to Cleveland, with Southern California eventually carrying off the prize to Los Angeles. By the third game of his freshman season with the Trojans, Jeter was a starter, an almost unprecedented achievement at USC. In 1975 he was selected to some All-American teams and in 1976 he repeated this time as a consensus first team defensive tackle. In the subsequent NFL draft in 1977, the New Giants tabbed him with the fifth pick of the first round. He went on to play six seasons with the Giants, before returning to California to play six more years with the Los Angeles Rams recording 11 sacks in 1985 and a career high 11½ sacks in 1988, before finishing his career with the New England Patriots in 1989. He subsequently returned to Greater Cleveland where he has made his home in North Royalton and has frequently been heard as a football analyst on Cleveland radio.

Al Carroll

Induction Year : 2008

Sport: Wrestling

The passion for wrestling that burned in his small frame as he collected victories in each of his last 30 dual meets for Cleveland’s John Marshall High never ebbed. It became instead the torch which guided the rest of his life and played a substantial role in the development of Ohio High School wrestling as one of the nation’s premier programs. He was one of a trio of men who took leading roles in co-founding the Ohio State Wrestling Tournament which debuted in 1938 and for which he served as the official scorer for 60 years. He subsequently would become a co-founder of the Brecksville Holiday Wrestling Tournament which began in 1961 and is credited with setting the standard for holiday tournaments across the nation. Three years out of high school in 1936 he was officiating high school matches, later adding college matches as well, winning general acclaim as one of the state’s best officials long before closing out that phase of his career in 1994. Throughout it all –for 50 years beginning in 1946-47—he would serve as Secretary of the Greater Cleveland Wrestling Coaches and Officials Association, a beacon of consistency through a myriad of changes in the organization. Inducted into the Ohio Wrestling Hall of Fame in 1972, he was named Ohio’s Man of the Year by Wrestling USA Magazine in 1993. He died at the age 85 in January, 1999.
(Deceased)